Capilano Suspension Bridge

Only minutes away from downtown Vancouver, Capilano Suspension Bridge takes you to the natural splendor of rainforest trails through magnificent evergreens and the unique perspective of Treetops Adventure, a walk high in the trees.

In 1889 a Scotsman known as George Grant Mackay suspended the first swing bridge over the waters of Capilano Canyon. He was so impressed with theĀ  surrounding beauty that he built a cabin for his family. Then with the help of the natives and a team of horses he pulled taut the first cedar plank and hemp rope bridge 450 across and 230 feet above the Capilano River.

The Capilano Suspension Bridge is now a world renowned attraction.

70 metres above the Capilano River

70 metres above the Capilano River

As you stroll around the Park, you will find passport stamps at six locations. When you have “stamped” your passport at the six locations, proceed to the Trading Post for your official “I Made It” validation.

In 1911, the tea House which is now the Trading post was built on the edge of the Capilano Canyon. Later during the 1930’s the bridge owner initiated the tradition of inviting local natives to place their totem poles on the ground. The totem poles you see there today are kept in the exact condition in which they were received all those years ago.

Totem Poles

Totem Poles

Attractions continue to be added to the Park – The Story Centre, Treetops Adventure and Living Forest exhibits are such examples.

Capalino Suspension Bridge

Capilano Suspension Bridge